Sister Fox at Myth & Moor

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by Unsettling Wonder

If you like poetry and foxes and Jane Yolen, then you’ll love this. Over at her blog Myth & Moor, the ever-astonishing Terri Windling has just posted her review of Jane’s new poetry collection Sister Fox’s Field Guide to the Writing Life, And her review is as beautiful and haunting and thought-provoking as we’ve come to expect from Terri Windling over the years. It has some fascinating pictures of foxes in. And, best of all, it has exclusive sneak-previews from the collection: some fragments of verses, an illustration by Laura Rae, and, yes, a whole poem. The magic portal to all this wonder is here.

(Oh, and while you’re there, be sure to hover your mouse pointer over each of the images of the page. Trust me on this one–just do it.)

Many of the poems in Sister Fox first appeared on Myth & Moor, so we’ve come full circle in a very good way. Terri writes:

Although this is a book that will speak most of all to fellow writers (especially here in the Mythic Arts field), it also has much to offer to creative artists in general….and isn’t that all of us? We all create in one way or another: not only in forms traditionally labelled as art, but also in crafting our homes, our gardens, our meals, our families, our work, our communities, and in sculpting the very shape of our lives. In this book, Sister Fox gathers poems that address the daily-yet-timeless process of making, and how that effects our lives, our world.

So high-tail it across to Myth & Moor for this entrancing look at Jane Yolen’s truly special new collection. And then high-tail it back here to pre-order your copy of the limited edition hardback.

the-fox-1913

October 2, 2013


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Unsettling Wonder

We craft and tell stories because we’ve stood on the uncertain edge between the waking world and our imagination, between enchantment and fear. And we remember other stories that help us build our own stories, scraps of lumber and fragments of narrative we gather together to make stories for ourselves.

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Artwork by Laura Rae